Clifton Rugby Football Club History
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James Arthur Bush

 
 
 

James Arthur Bush selected for England (Forward). Born 28th July 1850 in Cawnpore (now Kanpur), Uttar Pradesh, India. Died 21st September 1924, Clevedon, Somerset. He also played cricket for Gloucestershire and the MCC. He was W.G.Grace's friend and Best Man at his wedding.

INTERNATIONAL RECORD: English Caps 1872-3,5-6

Career Record: P5, W3, D2, L0, Tries 0, Cons 0, Pen 0, DropG 0

5th Feb 1872 v Scotland (The Oval, London) W 1G,1DG,2T-0 (Att 4000)

3rd March 1873 v Scotland (Hamilton Crescent, Glasgow) D 0-0 (Att 5000)

8th March 1875 v Scotland (Raeburn Place, Edinburgh) D 0-0 (Att 7000)

13th Dec 1875 v Ireland (Leinster CG) W 1G,1T-0

6th March 1876 v Scotland (The Oval, London) W 1G,1T-0

 

In 1861 the Bush family lived at Weston Villa, Park Place, Weston-super-Mare. They were

Name Relation Age Occupation Where born
Robert Bush Head 52 Retired Major in the Army Bristol
Emily A Bush Wife 39   Cheshunt, Hertfordshire
Henry F T Bush Son 15   Tasmania
Alfred G Bush Son 14   Perth, Western Australia
Mary A E Bush Dau 12   Perth, Western Australia
James A Bush Son 10   Cawnpore, India
Robert E Bush Son 5   Redland, Gloucestershire
James P Bush Son 3   Brislington, Somerset
Emily E F Bush Dau 2   Brislington, Somerset
John E Bush Son 2   Brislington, Somerset
Euphemia Sullivan Bush Dau 8   Brislington, Somerset
Elizabeth Hoggitt Serv 27 Housemaid Woolavington, Somerset
Harriet Parker Serv 25 Nursemaid Tiddesham, Gloucestershire
Rebecca Inailand Serv 26 Cook Domestic Wick, Gloucestershire

Weston Villa is 2 Park Place and is now an office of the British Mountaineering Council

Standing (L-R) ?, John Charles Ker Fox, Herbert James Bodington, Stephen Newcombe Fox, Alfred Terrett Taylor. Seated: Llewellyn John Kenyon Stow, Edward Fernando Sutton Tylecote, James Arthur Bush, ?. On Ground: ?, William Edward Ker Fox, Edward Roper.

Above the Clifton College Cricket XI of 1868 with James Arthur Bush seated second right.

In 1871 the Bush family lived at 7 Rodney Place, Clifton. They were

Name Relation Age Occupation Where born
Robert Bush Head 62 Retired Major of Army & Landowner Bristol
Emily Adria Bush Wife 49   Cheshunt, Hertfordshire
Henry Frederick Tobin Bush Son 25 Merchant & Ensign of Volunteers Tasmania
Alfred George De Lisle Bush Son 24 Merchant Western Australia
Mary Ann Eliza Bush Dau 22   Western Australia
James Arthur Bush Son 20 Clerk to a Merchant Bengal
Robert Edwin Bush Son 15 Scholar Westbury-on-Trym, Gloucestershire
James Paul Bush Son 13 Scholar Brislington, Somerset
Emily Eliza Fanny Bush Dau 12   Brislington, Somerset
John Ernest Bush Son 12 Scholar Brislington, Somerset
Adria Georgina Bush Dau 9   Brislington, Somerset
Euphemia Sullivan Bush Dau 8   Brislington, Somerset
Mary Ann Bridget Dyer Serv 32 Governess Bristol
Emma Bartram Serv 24 Housemaid Stringston, Somerset
Emily Milson Serv 23 Cook St.Georges, Gloucestershire
Emily Day Serv 18 Housemaid Alveston, Gloucestershire
William Scott Serv 16 Page Bristol

Above 7 Rodney Place, Clifton.

He started playing rugby for Bedminster Rugby Club in a field at the back of the Hen & Chicken Inn but played for Blackheath Rugby Club to gain recogniton to play for England. The Hen & Chicken was on North Street and was rebuilt on the corner of Greville Road around 1905 the Hen & Chicken was rebuilt again in the 50s having suffered extensive bomb damage during the war.

Above on 15th January 1872 Bush played in an England trial at Blackheath against Ravenscourt Park. Bush is down as playing for Bedminster.

Standing (L-R): J.A.Body (Gipsies), F.I.Currey (Marlborough Nomads), S.Finney (R.I.E. College), H.Freeman (Marlborough Nomads), F.W.Mills (Marlborough Nomads), A.St.G.Hamersley(Marlborough Nomads), F.W.Isherwood (Ravenscourt Park), A.G.Guillemard (West Kent), W.W.Pinching (Guys Hospital), P.Wilkinson (Law Club), J.E.H.Mackinlay (St. Georges Hospital), F.Luscombe (Gipsies), C.W.Sherrard (Royal Engineers). Seated: F.B.G.D'Aguilar (Royal Engineers/Bath), J.A.Bush (Blackheath), F.Stokes (Blackheath), T.Batson (Blackheath), J.E.Bentley (Gipsies), William Moberly (Ravenscourt Park). Absent: D.L.P.Turner (Richmond)

Above a photo of the England team v Scotland on 5th Feb 1872, which included future Clifton players J.A.Bush and W.O.Moberly. Note this was a 20-a-side team, one player, Turner, is missing from the picture. James Bush was chosen to play rugby for England after making a 5 appearances for Blackheath. He was forced to join Blackheath because at the time to be selected to play for England you had to belong to a club that was affiliated to the RFU. As the RFU had only been in existance for 1 year this proved a problem for many players and several joined affiliated clubs and didn't play for them just so they could be selected to play for England. 2 other examples are the Oxford University pair of William Octavius Moberly and Francis William Isherwood. They both joined Ravenscourt Park as Oxford University wasn't affiliated. Moberly, the Oxford Captain, went on to play for Clifton RFC and teach at Clifton College. This affiliation policy was the RFU's way of getting all clubs to join. Unfortunately no players from Northern clubs played in this second international. The whole England team was comprised of players affiliated to London clubs. Bush joined Clifton RFC later in the year and gained 4 more England rugby caps.

Above drawing of the England v Scotland match at the Oval on 5th Feb 1872 in which future Clifton players James Arthur Bush and William Moberly took part. On the left is what looks like James Bush.

awaiting photo

Above The 1872 England cap awarded to James Arthur Bush

Standing (L-R): E.C.Cheston (Law Club), J.E.H.Mackinlay (St.Georges Hospital), M.W.Marshall (Blackheath), H.Freeman (Marlborough Nomads), W.R.B.Fletcher (Marlborough Nomads), S.Morse (Law Club), C.H.Rickards (Gipsies), C.W.Boyle (Oxford University), E.R.Still (Ravenscourt Park), C.H.R.Vanderspar (Richmond). Sitting (L-R): J.E.H.Makinlay (St.Georges Hospital), D.P.Turner (Richmond), F.Stokes (Captain) (Blackheath), F.Luscombe (Gipsies), J.A.Bush (Clifton), F.W.Mills (Marlborough Nomads). On Ground (L-R): H.Marsh (R.I.E. College), J.A.Body (Gipsies), S.Finney (R.I.E. College), Hon H.A.Lawrence (Richmond).

Above the England team that played Scotland on 3rd March 1873 with Clifton's James Arthur Bush. Image courtesy of the RFU. This was the first international cap won by a Clifton player in its first season. It was James Bush's second cap and England's third international. It wasn't till after this match that the Scottish Rugby Union was formed on the 3rd March 1873.

Above first recorded minutes of Gloucestershire CCC, 26th April 1873. The meeting was attended by Clifton’s James Arthur Bush and his father Colonel Robert Bush.

James Bush couldn't play for England in 1874 as he was on tour in Australia with W.G.Grace's MCC side and so missed a match v Scotland on 23rd Feb 1874 as well as playing for Clifton.

Back Row (L-R): J.A.Bush, W.Oscroft, R.Humphrey, J.Southerton, M.McIntyre, F.H.Boult, A.Greenwood, W.R.Gilbert. Front Row: James Lillywhite, W.G.Grace, H.Jupp, G.F.Grace.

Above the MCC tour party to Australia in 1873/74 with James Arthur Bush. The MCC set sail from Southampton on October 23rd 1873. 2 weeks previous James Bush was W.G's best man at his wedding on the 9th October 1873 at St.Mathias Church in West Brompton, London. The bride's family lived at Clapham Common. This trip also acted as W.G's honeymoon. They arrived back in England on May 18th 1874. A trip back by boat that took nearly 50 days.

Above drawing of the MCC tour party. James Bush is bottom right corner.

James Arthur Bush also played cricket for Gloucestershire from 1870-1890, The Gentlemen v Players in 1874 and 1875.

FIRST-CLASS (1870 - 1890) James Arthur Bush

 

M

I

NO

Runs

HS

Ave

100

50

Ct

St

Batting & Fielding

148

224

67

1263

57

8.04

0

2

206

93

 

Balls

M

R

W

Ave

BBI

5

10

SR

Econ

Bowling

136

13

65

0

-

-

0

0

-

2.86

Above left scorecard from the Gloucestershire v Surrey match played on Durdham Down. The first match ever played by Gloucestershire. They played all their early matches on The Downs. It was a condition of playing on The Downs that they didn't charge any gate money, this attracted large crowds. Above right scorecard from the Gloucestershire v MCC match played later in the season. Both matches featured James Arthur Bush, only 2 years out of school. He was only 19 when he played his first match for Gloucestershire. Gloucestershire won all eleven of the matches they played in 1870

Glous CCC 1874

Gloucestershire CCC v Yorkshire August 1874 - Clifton College. Back row, left to right: Pullin(umpire), T.G.Matthews, E.C.B.Ford ,J.A.Bush ,R.E.Bush , E.M.Grace, E.M.Knapp. Front row, left to right:. J.Crook, F.Townsend, W.G.Grace, G.F.Grace, R.F.Miles.

Above 2 similar pictures of the Gloucestershire team that defeated Yorkshire at Clifton College in August 1874 by an innings and 78 runs. The team included both the Clifton RFC players James Arthur Bush and his younger brother Robert Edwin Bush. These photographs must have been taken seconds apart. The main difference is in the position of the people in the back row. These pictures are the earliest known of a Gloucestershire Cricket side.

W.G.Grace, in his book "Cricketing Reminiscences & Personal Recollections", published in 1899, recalls a match at Kadina in Australia with James Bush

"When Mr. Bush went in to bat he missed the first ball, and was clean bowled. As he was the last man in, the Kadina men began to move towards the tent, but Bush, in the coolest possible manner, picked up the stump, put it in the ground, and turning to the umpire said, "That was only my trial ball. I always insist on having a trial"; whereupon the umpire, no doubt thinking that Mr. Bush knew more about cricket than he did, said, "Certainly, sir," and gave him ‘in’. The decision made no difference to the course of events, as Bush, after all the trouble he had taken to get another innings, failed to score - his partner being promptly dismissed in the next over."

W.G.Grace called James Bush "Frizzy" and also played rugby for Bedminster with him on the odd occasion. As early as 1871 a 23 year old W.G played rugby for Bedminster against Bath on the North Parade ground. The Bath Chronicle recorded on the 16th March 1871 'time called at 5pm when Bath scored four rouges and Bedminster one goal, seven rouges and one try. (Goal kicked by W.G.Grace)'. In a match in 1881 W.G. played with several Cliftonians in Bedminster. It was a rule in those days that whoever retrieved the ball when it went out, got to throw it back in. This usually meant a sharp run for possession. When W.G. was racing for the ball after it had gone out his opponent drew level and tripped up the big man who somersaulted over into a bank. No mean feat. W.G. Played very few games of rugby after that. Kicking an opponent was all part of the game in those days. After finishing rugby James Bush played association football as a goalkeeper for Clifton Association Football Club.

Above Bush still played for Bedminster in 1874. On 28th November he captained the side against Wells. Also in the Bedminster side were the Clifton players Butterworth, Randolph, the Allen brothers, and Price.

Back Row (L-R): E.Townsend, F.Allen, W.Strachan, J.G.Thomson, E.Phillips, J.H.Powell, W.R.Webb, A.H.Allen, W.S.Paul, G.T.Budd, W.R.Gribble, A.K.Butterworth. Sitting: E.J.Taylor, M.M.Curtis, C.Strachan, A.C.St.Paul, J.A.Bush. On Ground: F.Morris, C.Chamberlain, J.Curtis, J.D.Miller.

Above Clifton Football Club in the 1874-75 season. James Arthur Bush wearing his England shirt and cap.

James Bush had a try disallowed in the match v Scotland on 8th March 1875. Scotlands M.Cross fumbled a towering kick behind his line; Bush and Collins fell on him and claimed a touch down which wasn't given.

Back Row (L-R): E.P.Warren, H.Nash, W.Fairbanks, E.Phillips, W.Strachan, E.J.Taylor, W.S.Paul, W.R.Webb, J.H.Dunn, J.Curtis, M.Curtis, F.Morris, J.G.Thomson. Middle Row: R.E.Bush, C.Strachan, A.C.St.Paul, J.D.Miller. In Front: W.R.Gribble, J.A.Bush.

Clifton 1875-76. E.J.Taylor, J.D.Miller, A.K.Butterworth and M.M.Curtis take part in England trials. In the picture above 3 of those players are wearing different shirts to the other players (except J.A.Bush who is wearing his England shirt). I assume that these shirts were for that trial. Also in the above photograph is Walter Fairbanks who played cricket for Cambridge University (although not a blue) and Gloucestershire. He was also a Cambridge Blue at rugby appearing in the 1873 and 74 varsity finals. He was a master at Clifton College from 1875-96.

Above photo from the same session that appeared in newspapers

Standing (L-R): ?, ?, ?, J.A.Bush (Clifton), ?, ?, ?, ?, ?. Siting (L-R): ?, ?, ?, F.Luscombe (Captain) (Gipsies),?, ?, ?. On Ground (L-R): ?, ?, ?, ?.

Above the England team that played Ireland on 13th December 1875 with Cliftons James Arthur Bush standing 4th from left. This was the first international match England played in Ireland. Image courtesy of the RFU.

Back Row (L-R): F.H.Lee (Oxford University), H.J.Gragham (Wimbledon Hornets), W.H.Hunt (Preston Grasshoppers), A.W.Pearson (Blackheath), R.Walker (Manchester), W.C.Hutchinson (R.I.E. College). Middle Row (L-R): A.H.Heath (Oxford University), F.R.Adams (Richmond), E.Kewley (Liverpool), W.E.Collins (St.Georges Hospital), L.Stokes (Blackheath), M.W.Marshall (Blackheath). Front Row (L-R): E.C.Cheston (Richmond), R.H.Birkett (Clapham Rovers), T.S.Tetley (Bradford), F.Luscombe (Captain) (Gipsies), J.A.Bush (Clifton), W.C.W.Rawlinson (Blackheath). On Ground: W.Greg (Manchester), G.R.Turner (St.Georges Hospital).

Above the England team that played Scotland on 6th March 1876 at the Oval. This was the last 20-a-side England International and Cliftons James Arthur Bush's last game for England. Image courtesy of the RFU. It became 15-a-side on February 5th 1877.

Above programme from the England v Scotland match played on 6th March 1876 at the Oval.

Back Row (L-R): J.Curtis, J.G.Thomson, F.Morris, J.C.Gilmore, J.H.Dunn, W.Fairbanks, J.D.Miller, W.Strachan, M.Curtis, W.O.Moberly, E.Phillips. Sitting: J.A.Bush, C.Strachan (Captain), H.W.Peck. W.S.Paul was absent when this photograph was taken.

Above Clifton XV of 1876-77 with Bush at the front.

Above (L-R): J.Curtis, F.Morris, J.A.Bush, W.Fairbanks, E.Phillips, W.O.Moberly, W.Strachan, M.Curtis, H.W.Peck, J.G.Thomson. Sitting: J.C.Gilmore, C.Strachan (Captain), J.H.Dunn. On Ground: J.D.Miller. W.S.Paul was absent when this photograph was taken.

Above another photograph from the same session in 1876.

Back Row: J.A.Bush, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?. Front Row: ?, ?, ?, W.G.Grace, ?,?.

Above 1877 photograph of Glos CCC with Clifton RFC International James Arthur Bush.

Back Row (L-R): ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?. Seated: J.A.Bush, E.M.Grace, W.G.Grace, ?, ?. On Ground: ?, W.R.Gilbert, ?.

Above a Gloucestershire CCC XI of the 1880s with James Artur Bush

At the time of the 1881 Census he was staying at St.Vincents Rock Hotel, Sion Hill, Clifton, Gloucestershire, aged 30 and a “Gentleman.” His wife Lillie, aged 21, was born at Melbourne, Victoria, as was Mabel Oldham aged 13 who was staying with them. Other visitors were two unmarried ladies, Mary E.Hellyar, aged 61, and Laura C.Hellyar, aged 59, both born at Oldcombe, Somerset. The Hotel staff comprised two barmaids, a book keeper, a cook, a housemaid, a waiter and a billiard marker.

Above (L-R) Back Row: J.A.Bush, A.D.Greene, H.Hale, D.D.Radcliffe, G.Francis. Front: W.G.Grace.

Above Gloucestershire Cricket Amateurs 1886. For more on A.D.Greene click here

Back Row (L-R): ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?. Seated: J.A.Bush, J.H.Brain, W.G.Grace, E.M.Grace, ?. On Ground: ?, E.L.Griffiths.

Above the Gloucestershire cricket team at Brighton in 1888. Seated extreme left is Clifton RFC player James Arthur Bush. He retired from cricket in 1890. He played his last game for Clifton RFC in 1880.

Back Row (L-R): O.G.Radcliffe, G.Francis, T.W.Stubbs, J.A.Bush, E.L.Griffiths. Seated: E.M.Grace, W.G.Grace (Captain), J.H.Brain. On Ground: W.Troup, W.W.Pullen, A.Newnham.

Above the Gloucestershire cricket team in 1887. As well as Bush Troup and Newnham also played rugby for Clifton. Image courtesy Roy Hough.

On July 25th 1888 James Arthur Bush was swordbearer during the unveiling of the statue of Queen Victoria on College Green.

The statue was unveiled by HRH Prince Albert, Duke of Clarence (who died in 1892) eldest son of Edward VII fiancé of the future Queen Mary. The Prince, doffing his silk hat, stands with the Mayor of Bristol, Mr (later Sir) R.H.Symes (also 4 times mayor), holding umbrella. The swordbearer, J.A.Bush, with Plantagenet Cap stands left.

James Bush is listed as sword bearer from 1883-1924. The sword bearers main role is every year at St Mary Redcliffe church on Whitsuntide the church is strewn with rushes and the Lord Mayor and Corporation attend service there in honour of one of Bristol's greatest citizens. The beautiful Pearl Sword is carried by the City Sword Bearer. (Its scarlet scabbard is encrusted with a crown, a rose, a thistle, a harp, a dragon, three lions and the arms of Bristol, some of them wrought with seed pearls.) The sword once belonged to King Richard II, who sold it to the Corporation for £50 in order to fund his liking for feasting. He was very imaginative in his choice of dishes, a fact that is commemorated in the nursery rhyme Four and Twenty Blackbirds Baked in a Pie.

The present day service of bearing the sword to St.Mary Redcliffe is shown below. The service is known as the Rush Sunday Civic Service and was first introduced by William Canynge, five times Mayor of Bristol. He was one of the richest merchants in Bristol in the 15th century and after he completed the restoration of the church, he gave up all his worldly possessions to become a priest. In 1468 he was ordained and sang his first Mass at St Mary Redcliffe Church, on Whitsunday that year. It was 25 years later, that William Spenser Mayor of Bristol instituted the service to commemorate William Canynge, and until the Reformation it was three sermons on the Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday following Whitsunday. The service takes its name from the rushes and herbs that are strewn on the floor.

Above left: Modern Rush Sunday Service Above middle: The Pearl Sword Above right: The 1909 Rush Service with James Bush as Swordbearer.

Standing (L-R): ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?. Sitting: J.A.Bush, ?, W.G.Grace, J.Cranston, ?. On Ground: ?, ?.

Above the Gloucestershire County Cricket team of 1889. Seated extreme left is James Arthur Bush, now 39 years old. W.G.Grace (centre seated) was 41. In 1888 Gloucestershire had beaten the Australians twice.

James Arthur Bush's last first-class cricket match was on the 28th to the 30th July 1890, for Gloucestershire against Yorkshire at Dewsbury and Savile Ground, Savile Town, Dewsbury. Gloucestershire won by 84 runs. In all he made 148 first-class appearances, including 136 for Gloucestershire. His cricket statistics were

FIRST-CLASS (1870 - 1890) James Arthur Bush

 

M

I

NO

Runs

HS

Ave

100

50

Ct

St

Batting & Fielding

148

224

67

1263

57

8.04

0

2

206

93

 

Balls

M

R

W

Ave

BBI

5

10

SR

Econ

Bowling

136

13

65

0

-

-

-

-

-

2.86

His last match in Bristol was for Gloucestershire against Australia on 10th to the 12th July 1890. The match was drawn.

At the time of the 1891 Census James Arthur Bush was living at 10 Royal York Crescent, Clifton.

Name Relation Age Occupation Where born
James A Bush Head 40 Merchant Cawnpour, India
Reginald A. Bush Son 8   Westbury-on-Trym, Gloucestershire
Esther A Mansfield Serv 29 General Servant Bath, Somerset
Lillian V. Clifford Dressmaker 17 Dressmaker Wilts

Above 10 Royal York Crescent, Clifton.

In 1891 his mother and sister Adria were living at 1 Worcester Terrace, Clifton.

At the time of the 1901 Census James Arthur Bush was living at 13 The Mall, Clifton.

Name Relation Age Occupation Where born
Alice M. Dryland Head 65 Dealer in Games Pimlico
Fanny Walters Niece 44 Assistant Pimlico
Ellen Thomas   57 Assistant Bath
James A Bush   50 General Merchant India

In 1901 his mother and sister Adria were living at 41 Caledonia Place, Clifton.

James Bush took over the family business in 1905 with his brother George de Lisle Bush. The family had run a warehousing company since 1700. The warehouse itself was known as Bush Warehouse. The company passed on to his son, Reginald Arthur Bush in 1926 and was known as J&R Bush until it ceased trading in the 1960s. The building, below left, is now more famous for being the home of The Arnolfini, below right, a leading centre for contemporary Arts. The family had originally bought the building in 1846 from Acraman, Bush, Castle & Co. who had gone bankrupt. They also had premises in Marsh Street and Baldwin Street. The family were prominent Merchant Venturers.

Above advert for J&R Bush Ltd from a 1962 magazine.

In 1911 James Arthur Bush and his family were living at Flat 3, 8 Manilla Road, Clifton, Bristol. They had been married 30 years and had 1 child.

Name Relation Age Occupation Where born
James Arthur Bush Head 60 Public Bonded Warehouseman Cawnpore, India
Reginald Arthur Bush Son 28 Assisting in the business Westbury, Glos
Lillie Bush Wife 49   Victoria. Resident Australia
Maraget Richards Servant 30 Nurse Attendant Belgium, Resident India

Above 8 Manilla Road, Clifton, Bristol.

Above James Arthur Bush's signature.

James Arthur Bush's best friend W.G.Grace died on 23rd October 1915. He attended his funeral at Elmer's End Cemetry on October 26th 1915. W.G. was buried next to his eldest son W.G. Junior, who died of appendicitis and his daughter, Bessie, who died of typhoid.

On 17th January 1917 his nephew, Hugh Godfrey De Lisle Bush died of wounds in Torquay. Wounded at Loos in October 1915 and evacuated to England. Educated at Eton. He is buried at St. Michael's Church, Eastington, Glos.

Above Hugh Godfrey De Lisle Bush from The War Illustrated 8th May 1915. Eldest son of George De Lisle Bush of Eastington Park, Stonehouse. His brother John Stewart De Lisle Bush, educated at Cheltenham College, also died in WW1 on 25th August 1917. He is buried at Honnechy Bristish Cemetery, Nord, France.

Above James Arthur Bush just before he died

James Arthur Bush died on 21st September 1924. His obituary appeared in The Times on 24th September 1924 and said

BUSH.- on the 21st Sept., at Clevedon, Somerset, James Arthur BUSH of Clifton, Gloucestershire, third son of the late Major Robert Bush, age 74 years. Service at 2 o'clock Christ Church, Clifton, tomorrow (Thursday). Internment afterwards at Canford Cemetery. Flowers may be sent to Brynteg, Brecon Road, Westbury-on-Trym, near Bristol. Friends, please accept this, the only intimation.

Above Christ Church Clifton

Above the grave of James Arthur Bush at Canford Cemetery, Bristol.

Above map of Canford Cemetery with the position of Bush's grave marked in red.

Above a view of Canford Crematorium with the grave of James Arthur Bush on the left behind the tree.

In the Bristol Times and Mirror on 23rd September 1924 the death of James Bush was announced. Reproduced below with a few errors.

DEATH OF MR. J. A. BUSH

A Great Cricketer and Footballer

SWORD BEARER OF BRISTOL

We regret to announce the death on Sunday night at Clevedon of Mr. James Arthur Bush, a gentleman well known in Bristol. In early life his connection with Gloucestershire cricket bought him into great prominance, and in later years he became familiar to many by reason of the office he held as City Sword Bearer. He belonged to a family whose association with the city extended over a period of nearly three centuries. One of his ancestors, Paul Bush, was the first Bishop of Bristol.

The deceased gentleman was the son of Col. J. R. Bush, of the 96th Regiment, and was born in Cawnpore in 1850. The following year his father returned to England, and settling in this neighbourhood, sent his son to Clifton College, where he commenced a unique athletic career which lasted thirty years. As a boy he was perhaps more prominent at Rugby football than cricket, but he got his cap at both games while at school. Anyone who has had the opportunity of inspecting the framed groups of the College cricket elevens which hang in the old pavilion, will realise that in the 'sixties the leaving age was by no means so young as at present, for many members of the team sported whiskers, and a J. A. Bush was among the number.

Upon leaving school he was so keen about football that after assisting Clifton and Bedminster he joined the famous Blackheath Club. This necessitated weekly journeys to London, but they were cheerfully faced, because that was the only road to an International cap.

PLAYED FOR ENGLAND

After two seasons' consistant work he found his way into the South team, and eventually he was called upon to play for England. All told he took part in five international matches and was never on the loosing side. His position was usually quaarter back - the team in those days consisted of twenty men - though as he was speedy, in spite of weighing 13 1/2 stone, he often went forward. Keen as he was about the Rugby game. In later life he turned his attention to Association. For two or three winters he regularly kept goal for Clifton, and became sufficiently expert to assist Gloucestershire. He was always a fine kicker, and on one occasion he kicked from goal to goal.

IN GLOUCESTERSHIRES GREAT SIDE

Great was the fame he won on the football field, he was far more widely known as a cricketer. His school days came to a close just about the time that the Gloucestershire County Cricket Club was formed, and for nearly twenty years he was one of the capable hand of amateurs that who rallied round Dr. W. G. Grace, and made his team one of the most formidable in the country. What his old captain and life-long friend thought of him is recorded in his book "Cricket." This is what W.G. wrote:- "It willbe news to many that he was first played for his batting and fielding. The year 1877 was his best in batting for the country, when he averaged 22.75, but he did not keep it up afterwards; though fortunately he tried his hand with the gloves, and soon proved himself to be one of the best amateur wicket-keepers of his day. I have little hesitation in saying that at his best he was the safest amateur wicket-keeper for a catch, no matter how fast the bowling, and I have heard outside opinions expressed to the same effect. He kept wicket for the eleven I took out to Australia in 1873-4, and it was the general opinion of the team that no wicket-keeper alive couldhave done betteror stood the wear and tear of the task so well. He represented the Gentlemen in 1874 and 1875. As a batsman he used to have good defence and could hit; but he is about the most casual player I know. At the Oval, when Gloucestershire played Surrey in 1876, he played at a ball on the leg side and missed it. Without looking to see Pooley had stopped the ball he quietly stepped out of his ground and was stumped. He had got it into his head that such a ball ought to go to the boundary. We chaffed him over it but he did not mind, and when he telegraphed the score home that evening he coolly added 'I was maginificently stumped off a leg-shooter'. In a match at Kadma, South Australia, he was bowled first ball; but he quietly put the bail on again , and said he never could play a trial ball, and wished the cricket authorities would expunge it from the rules. He gained his point, and returned batting. But on another occasion at Castlemaine, the laugh went against him. We had only a few runs to win, and I sent him in first on a bumpy wicket. He insisted on having first ball, and told his partner he was going to run everything. The first ball was a shooter, and just grazed the leg stump, the bail falling quietly down. His partner not noticing it, yelled, 'Come on Frizzy!' But after they had run three the wicket-keeper and bowler, to his disgust, pointed to the wicket and asked if it was a running match. In the same match he kept wicket splendidly; but the umpire not quite sympathising with his display declined to give a man out, on the ground that the top of his nose was just over the wicket, and that it was an infringment of the law.

SOME STORIES

Many other stories are told of him. Here is one related by Bob Thoms, the celebrity umpire:- During a match between Sussex and Gloucestershire at Brighton, Mr. J. A. Bush had come in to join Woof for the last wicket, and in running for a hit to leg was a long way out of his ground when the wicket was put down by Phillips, who, however previous to the ball reaching him had dislodged both bails with his body. W.G., who like an ogre always watched the play from start to finish, spotted the broken wicket, and immediately shouted from the pavillion, "Go back, Frizzy, go back." while the Sussex men halloaed, "Pull-up a stump, pull up a stump." The latter Harry Phillips forthwith did with ball lying fifteen yards from him. Flourishing the stump in the air he shouted "How's that?" the umpire replying "Not Out". Mr. J. A. Bush had in the meantime galloped back as fast as he could, not knowing what was up. As there were some thousands on the ground the incident caused a lot of excitement, as it appeared to the spectators that Mr. J. A. Bush was dead out. On my saying to Phillips "Well Harry, you got up a nice bit of pantomime for us", he replied "Oh! I knew it wasn't out, Bob; but when they shouted, "Pull up a stump. I thought I would do something to oblige them."

As a young man, Mr. J. A. Bush was a fine sprinter, and carried off many prizes. The last he won on the path was in the Old Boys' race at Clifton College in the late 'eighties or early 'nineties. He claimed the right to handicap himself, and starting from the limit mark was never overtaken. He was also an expert swimmer, an excellent boxer, and a good fives player. Billiards was one of his recreations in later life, and he placed more than one Clifton Club handicap to his credit.

Upon the death of Mr. Edward Stock in 1883, Mr Bush was appointed Sword Bearer, and held office up to the time of his death, although his illness had prevented his attendance at Council meetings on occasions of Assize for some months.

Mr. Bush's relations in this district include Mr. G. de Lisle Bush, Mr. R. E. Bush and Mr. Paul Bush C.M.G. (brothers), and a son.

The funeral will take place on Thursday. A service will be held at Christ Church at two o'clock, and the internment will be at Canford.

James Bush's wife Lily died on 6th July 1933. Her death was announced in The Times on 8th July 1933 and said

BUSH.- on July 6. 1933. Lily, widow of JAMES ARTHUR BUSH, passed peacefully away after short illness. Funeral service Westbury Parish Church, Bristol, 12 o'clock Monday. Internment Canford Cemetery following. Flowers may be sent to Brynteg, Brecon Road, Henleaze, Bristol.